Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago · 2 min. reading time · visibility ~10 ·

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Money and art

Money and art


It's obvious to buy art one must be rather wealthy. But to produce it, the creative person at least should have a source of money that is paying the rent and bills.

How to achieve this? I have no idea. I have been blessed to be born in a family with significant wealth in the history of the family line going back but have no means to support myself apart from benefits.

I do not get sales on articles that often I write. I am not paid to blog. I do not have a million followers offering me crowdfunding, affiliates or sponsorships. I am not on the zero grounds here.

But I try to educate myself further. Once I've had my student loans paid back by sitting there and rolling my eyes, I still have to educate myself more for a better chance to work in something that is even loosely based on art and culture. My financial situation would be a raging disaster if it wasn't for my family heritage.

Every rich kid is an artist wow zala bang! Quite a claim to make? But at least I am honest. I have starved, I've traveled without a budget and now I am making a film without absolutely no money but still I wouldn't lure myself into buying talent, creativity or true artistry on money.

It comes from within. No matter what the financial situation but you have to take account I wouldn't recommend this to anybody. New equipment costs a lot: for example I just got donated a new camera I could've only dreamt to afford myself. Travel for PR costs a lot, so does everything else. My only resort is not to pay to write, I as a professional expect to make some income out of it.

But now typing this on a school day in an open office I with most delightful honesty guarantee I hope you wouldn't try this at home. Despite the major fall-outs I have had in my family and with my friends due to my career choice and the monthly poverty I face and the official, annual employmency I have to live with, I do recommend not to get into the creative industry.

It might be my works are found as art decades after (I have passed away). Good grief who knows if even this post will be only read then. There's absolutely no guarantee of the money flow coming in if you are a freelancer - and even if you promote yourself, your brand and your work really hard. There's no promise of a wealthy mesenate paying your gallery rent or your first film preview. In this industry you need somebody with hard cash behind you to make it.

Truth might hurt. There are many grants, funding plans, loan systems, crowdfunding and other sponsorships available but making an established name of yourself and becoming a money earning artist is a long run to people I know, at least, and me. Without a name in the spotlight or written in the stars one might wait for that one breakthrough for the rest of her or his life.

Money is not the reason I am an artist. It has never been. I have been naïve in my past about becoming one not understanding what is the financial reality of artist that are prone to homelessness, living on streets, renting homes with cockroaches in, staying in dodgy places and investing every penny they have on new pens, for example, to draw, and to let the passion lead the way. This is not a promise anybody will ever help the artist out. First the artist has to market the art work, which, usually, costs or make it big way on the art market by being found. It's like: how many unemployed actors can you find in Hollywood, LA?

Please do take this writing a provocation. Create, for free, a discourse, discussion, uproar, stand your grounds and talk! Please be brave to offer (me) solutions, write with sincerity about your own life or how you have perceived other creative people tackle down the issues with money or how they haven't. I am looking into new opportunities, new openings, new conversations on this debatable topic and my approach to it. Please be free to say what you want to say. Let's worry about hurt feelings later, if at all!

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Comments
Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #19

Eeva > "It's obvious to buy art one must be rather wealthy." With all due respect, I believe your statement only applies if one mistakenly assumes that the only good art is that which has achieved notoriety in the "art world". There is much good art to be had and enjoyed for affordable prices, if one is patient, does not pay for big names, and buys to keep rather than for investment.‪ https://www.bebee.com/producer/@friedman-phil/a-look-at-my-personal-collection ‬

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #18

Wow, can't believe all the views! Talk about BeBee being small! O_O

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #17

Netta Virtanen ! an artist from Finland !

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #16

#16
I will get back to you when my blog goes online again. Currently under construction.

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #15

#19
what do you think is replacing art as an a medium if the audiences and interest on it have never been lower? I mean, is there such a thing people go for now more than ever instead of (the) art(s)?

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #14

#18
more realism, less nonsense!

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #13

#20
I absolutely agree on your views of choosing carefully if you are going to be an artist. Of course, many in the creative industry say that money, numbers and figures are easily confused by the less corporate type in the art world, working more on the creative side of things on itself. thank you for your inspiring story of collecting art. Maybe you would be interested in checking out the www.taiko.fi website offering Finnish contemporary art online for affordable pricing.

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #12

#22
it is very profound. I am not sure if I am capable of understanding where the contemporary art doesn't make it to be art, rather than just contemporary artWORK. Maybe a more simple clarification would do for me. I don't know about you, others.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #11

It's necessary for would-be artists to face a couple of truths. Foremost, that not everyone who aspires to produce worthwhile art can do so. Yes, "beauty" (read artistic value) is in the eye of the beholder, but if it is only in your eye, consider taking up auto mechanics or some other trade, if for no other reason than to support yourself. Second, consider pricing your are so that it is affordable for ordinary people to own. My wife and I buy and display only original art in our home. We once bought a beautifully framed fairly large piece that we absolutely from the Miami artist Jeff Laibson for $800. We would not consider selling it, so have never had it valued, but I think it must be worth more than 10 times what we paid for it. Could not afford one now, but became big Laibson promoters because we could buy one then. IMO.

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

4 years ago #10

#13
My pleasure. Go ahead to quote my comments in your personal blog. Thanks for your courtesies! :)

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #9

#2
thank you for your considerate comment. I am happy you enjoyed your read. Please feel free to share my post on in your hives and/or other social media platforms.

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #8

#3
Thank you. Great involvement from you, guys!

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #7

#5
that's a great comment. It inspires me a lot. What do you do professionally? I mean, it makes me want to quote it in my personal blog. Are you interested?

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #6

#6
You have a very romantic idea of artists. Many, who are cold hearted and yet passionate, professional and strict about it, might not want to compare vital bodily functions to the importance of work. But nevertheless, a good reply and nice that you wish me so well. Thank you!

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #5

#8
Sometimes it's all about matreial, and what the audience/buyers want. It's difficult to say is it against the principles of creating an authentic piece of art or moreso leaning towards commission based work. At least, like many artists, the guy you write about created an innovation - even if he didn't financially profit of it.

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

Eeva Maria al-Khazaali

4 years ago #4

Many of those "homeless artists" #9 might be only discovered after their passing. Sadly, so. But the professional art world demands are quite different: you need to promote, go get, market, exhibit, be there, be a somebody. Not a sack of clothes laying in their bones down the street. The art world works in the terms of capitalism give and take, alike all other markets. You are making a good point on the 300 years of rich people. This trend has passed though, for the most part, since the rich people are nowdays making their own creative projects: music videos, tunes and other commercial whatnot. Your dream is quite beautiful as an ideal thought. I wish you good luck with it and all that goes with. I hear in Barcelona, Spain there are lot of communities you describe in your reply. Also Berlin, Germany might have something similar going on. Especially the Friedrichschein district once a center of underground art. But yet again, this dream only serves certain kind of artists. It seems to be for people who, including their creative processes, are willing to lead towards ecological living and self-sustaintable lifestyle. Very much good idea for hippie artists looking to save the world, not only sell their art and work as a professional artist. Living in a community like that takes all your time. Carrots don't grow themselves. So, if you'd like a job title fine artist/gardener, the community would be the best grounds for that.

Dean Owen

Dean Owen

4 years ago #3

I told a brilliant but invisible artist from a wealthy family that he needs a story or a theme. It could be doing Warholesque silk screens of Kim Jong Un, doing time as a political activist, suicide art, painting a sunset from the same location 365 days in a row, or whatever. He was too clean. Nothing interesting about his background. He started painting Buddhas and using gold leaf. Great stuff, but a dime a dozen these days in Asia. He still struggles.

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

4 years ago #2

Ah, with ease you’ve put down what it means to be artistic, and how ranks a journey that’s creative and challenging. Sometimes life creates different scenes, and one has to go through it…after all, life is like an ordeal. Wow, to be someone and have nothing, and yet take up newer roles is a great spirit. Keep up your aspirations, be courageous…and one day life becomes a lot easier, with unwavering commitments and honest strife. Start simple, grow big, with patience!

Paul Walters

Paul Walters

4 years ago #1

Eeva Maria Karhunen great piece...thank you

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